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'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are analyzing the information as we receive it. if the allegations are confirmed, then it is our position this
tunes. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is "gps global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you today from london. happy new year. on today's show, we'll look ahead at what 2013 might bring around the world. i have a great panel richard haass, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids
in the united states with their families while they work to earn green cards. as long as their relatives are u.s. citizens. the middle east tv news giant making a big move here in here e united states, al-jazeera bought current tv from former vice president al gore. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00, in with the new and out with the old. that is capitol hill hours ago, the historically unpopular 112th congress met a final time making way for the 113th congress. here is vice president biden swearing in members of the united states senate including 13 newcomers. on the other side, the house of representatives floor where new and returning members are sworn in. all eyes squarely on the embattled house speaker john boehner, the republican leader, underfire from members of his party over the troubled fiscal cliff negotiations and, too, his handling of the relief for victims of sandy. the question: would the backlash cost him the leadership job? mike, live on capitol hill. the speaker kept his job but there were defections and a lot of grum
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
the united arabs pledged money. >> there's no milita solution. this should be resolved through political solution. french troops are gaining ground in mali. they have taken control of the airport near algeria. french troops launched an operation three weeks ago. mali is a former frempnch colon. arabs have been kidnapped suspected of having links to the rebels and they have ramsacked shops. they sent a threat in nigeria. >>> three chinese naval vsels have left for exeises i the western pacific ocean be comments fueled concerns among china ea china's neighbors over how the military will deal with the number of territory disputes. >>> people living in china know the air they have been breathing is bad. they've created a higher smog alert to track air pollution. the aunt of high particulate air has been high. an increasing number of chinese are suffering from respiratory problems. they decided to add a third level to their two-level smog alert. the highest warning now advises people to stay indoors. >> translator: i can't stand it anymore. i want to leave this place. >> translator: it's the
as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both liberal and democratic or constitutional republic and. you can use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. z√úrich government based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution, hence the compound machine. one of the major charges raised against king george the third in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i've read that church. he, george the third has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowl
qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a d
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states' desire to push back. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid to get itself together to be able to, you know, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. and the u.s. kind of took a, well, you know, you're really not as important as egypt, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it. and the result was that the prime minister at the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention. and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically the way that oil pricing was conducted by squeezing the independent oil companies -- occidental petroleum first and foremost -- into changing the system whereby there would be a 50/50 split and, basically, controlling interests by u.s. companies in libyan oil. and the consequence of that has come through to this day in terms of increasing the power of, the economic power of the gulf states, available b ya in particular. -- saudi a
city, defense secretary leon panetta announced the united states military will no longer ban women from serving on the front lines of war. and open up hundreds of thousands of fighting jobs for women service members. the decision reverses the 1994 rule that restricted women from combat roles, even though women frequently found themselves in direct combat in iran and in afghanistan. many fought and died there, in fact, those wars led to the deaths of 152 american service women. the defense secretary leon panetta today said that not everybody will become a combat soldier, but that everyone is entitled to a chance. >> i go on to bethesda to visit wounded warriors and i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of men and women in uniform. they serve the wounded and they die right next to each other. >> shepard: the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff recommended the move and the bipartisan group of lawmakers says it supports the lifting of the ban, but critics say they do have some concerns, including the republican congressman and
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
. earlier, i spoke to the us ambassador, robert ford. he said that was a concern for the united states and they would keep asking the un for transparency on exactly how that money was part -- how it got to those who need it. >> they are only putting band- aids on the problem, rather than treating the actual cause. any chance there can be any diplomatic movement, given the large number of countries, given that some of the allies of the syrian regime are there? >> all the speeches are about the humanitarian situation and the pledges. you can see people milling around. this is just outside where they are having a banquet, the official lunch underway right now. i suspect around those tables, when you have those high-level figures, including the president of lebanon, one of the neighboring countries, king abdullah of jordan, people of that level, representatives of many countries involved -- i think there will be talks about the political impasse at the un , particularly those very strong comments that came from lacked are brahimi, the un-arab league -- from lakhdar brahimi, the un-arab lea
is no other options which is true because congress said you cannot bring them and prosecute them in the united states. so we have created the obstacles that make military commissions. we create our own justifications. it is because of the abusive treatment and detentions and if you peel it back, it's not about what they did to us, it's about what we did to them that makes military commissions seem like an attractive option. and you can't have trained police. i think the public knows that that is the case. every person that was apprehended on the battlefield -- i can't think of any but khalid sheikh mohammed and abu zubaydah were arrested while in pakistan. there were others arrested in dubai and somalia. we have to have this special forum about the battlefield conditions is a great part of this second rate process that is more about less will go what we are bringing to court. another part of the issue is the senate select committee who has completed their report. and also john mccain and dianne feinstein concluded that torture does not work. and it's a stain on our reputation. i think that it'
alongside men on the front liance. some opponents say this could lead to problems with unit cohesion and combat readiness. >> my issue here is, mixing the genderses in infantry units and armored units and special forces units is not a positive. there are many distracters which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to
to the president of the united states asking them to do. and the letter is in i think a copy of letter isn't maxing. also online. but what is so striking for me about that is if you stop for a moment and imagine that instant in time july 1903 where your brother has been kidnapped, and kidnapped a year ago and is in slavery, she's probably visited him. i think the letter signals that so she has seen in chains being worked with dozens of other men out on a farm, on a 20,000-acre plantation in south georgia owned by the most powerful white family in georgia at the time. she knows the desperate state he is in pictures of witness the deprivations being perpetrated against in -- against them. no one of power in her world cares come and to reach a moment of human desperation so great that the only thing you can think of to do still, the only thing left to try is write a letter to the president of the united states, at the magic that that might actually a college some good. the depth of desperation of that moment was so powerful to me when i first found out later. and, of course, what happened, nothing. no
with impunity. for the united states it hasn't been an area of vital interest ever. it's much closer to europe. it's much more of concern to europe than it has ever been for the united states. that's why we kind of led from behind. >> in libya. >> in libya itself. because europeans were the ones exercised about it. we didn't care that much in terms of vital national interests compare today say the gulf. but just as after the soviet union was thrown out of afghanistan, we considered afghanistan not of any real interest to us and of course that's where al qaeda took root. so here again we've got that problem. and we cannot afford to let this just burgeon forth because you can see in the attack in algeria that american lives are at stake here. >> this was the point secretary clinton made as part of her testimony. she says anywhere the united states is not have a significant involvement, particularly in such areas of instability and a threat from a jihadist movement and affiliate say of al qaeda, there could be real problems. we see it in algeria and yet what did we hear from the president this we
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
she did the basic job of representing the united states abroad tirelessly and well. she was very good in public forums. she would-- when she visited countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees take questions, be very visible. as secretary she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning that this superstar part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced he
. this was a chronology, and when the united states government announced large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what should we be doing in light of this particular population, which was different, the nation out of we've not been reselling a great deal. we look at what enhancement we could bring on board that would address this new population. and that's when we create the partnership with dod. initially that was iraqi focused. later when we work with the national -- >> was this in 2007? >> 2007. later when we identified additional capacity a new partnership, that initially was focus on iraq at because but we learn by doing that was learned that heightened level of checks which was initially oriented towards iraqi applicants, we expand to applicants of all nationality. so really we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there was some 20, 25,000 a year for a features are coming out of iraq. is that about right? >> i believe the high point is 18,000. >> i mean, that still 18,000 a year. did you have the resources and capacity to
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
-nonsense style. tim ignite her has said he will not stick around for a second term. the united states had s just about a month away from hitting the so-called debt ceiling the point where the government can't pay bills. the next treasury-secretary is key to make sure that doesn't happened but lew's intelligence on is raising red flags. during the last debt ceiling battle, lew clashed with the g.o.p. now he'll face some of those same lawmakers could be a very tough confirmation battle. what did the white house press second say about this. >> jack lew is the chief of staffed has served in a critical role for on this administration as director of the office of management and budget. a well known figure both here at the white house and throughout washington for the past four years. for more, here is jay carney. >> i would simply say that the president is obviously engaged in a process that will lead to decisions on who should fill posted or vacant. as was in the case this week with the defense department and c.i.a. and prior to that the state department, he will make announcements when he has made a
lobby" in a 2006 interview. >> i'm a united states senator. not an israeli senator. i'm a united states senator. i support israel. but my first interest is i take an oath of office to the constitution of the united states, not to a president, not to a party, not to israel. in 1988 he called james hormelthen president bill clinton's choice "openly aggressively gay." saying his sexual orientation would be an inhibiting factor. hagel has since apologized for that comment last month saying those remarks were insensitive. but outgoing congressman barney frank blasted him last night in a statement, "i cannot think of any other minority group in the u.s. today where such a negative statement and action made in 1988 would not be an obstacle to a major presidential appointment." t t the two have remained close since. the president has used that alliance as part of his sales pitch for hagel. >> i've served with chuck hagel, i know him. he is a patriot. >> senator jack reid who was also on that 2008 trip is expected to be, to do much of the leg work in the senate to get hagel's nomination over the
five of australia's six states. meanwhile, the united states records its hottest year ever. we will go to australia for report. three men of somali descent are arraigned in new york. president obama continues the controversial practice of rendition, secretly detaining, transporting, and holding prisoners overseas. part two of our exclusive interview with sami al-hajj, the of jazeera journalist imprisoned and tortured at guantanamo for six years. >> when i was in guantanamo, i asked myself maybe it is a good chance for me to be a journalist in guantanamo to be a witness. [indiscernible] >> we speak with the al jazeera journalist at al jazeera headquarters in doha, qatar. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. new figures have confirmed 2012 was the hottest year on record for the continental united states. on tuesday, the national oceanic and atmospheric administration announced an average temperature for 2012 of 55.3 degrees, one degree above the previous record and 3.2 degrees more than the 20th century ave
destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >> it is a necessary struggle. we cannot permit northern mali to become a safe haven. people say to me all the
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